Daniela Bertol - icosahedron & anatomical planes Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure: icosahedron standing on face Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure: icosahedron standing on face Daniela Bertol - making pentagons in the icosahedron Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure at Deakin dance studio in Burwood Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure at Deakin dance studio in Burwood Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure at Deakin University ADPML Gallery Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure at Deakin University ADPML Gallery Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure at Deakin University ADPML Gallery Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure at Deakin University ADPML Gallery Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & New York prototype Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & New York prototype Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & New York prototype Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & New York prototype Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & New York prototype Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & New York prototype Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & New York Maker Faire Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & New York Maker Faire Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure at Sun Farm Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure at Sun Farm Daniela Bertol - Movement Infrastructure & Rome Maker Faire
MOVEMENT INFRASTRUCTURE

The Movement Infrastructure (MI) is a built structure which supports and enables the production of movement defined by the symmetry and proportions of the human body. The MI is shaped from the icosahedron; it is an art and design product, based on hybrid manufacturing of modular systems. The prototypes are made of the connectors PolyConnec joining off-the-shelf components. OLED lighting will be included in upcoming prototypes.
      A participant placed at the center of the MI, from an almost stationary location can perform different movement routines based on geometric transformations:
  • arms and legs extensions and rotations
  • twists and bends from different anatomical joints
ICOSAHEDRON The "Laban icosahedron" is perhaps one of the most renown physical structures in dance. The name is from his creator Rudolf Laban (1879-1958), who applied the five regular polyhedra to movement sequences, he defined as "scale". The icosahedron, for one hundred year has been used in choreography by Rudolf Laban and his legacy as a framework for dance routines. 3D printing technology is used to facilitate the assembling of the icosahedron, which become easy to assemble readily available for fitness practices outside the dance studio. The geometry underpinning the icosahedron connections are also a metaphor for the movement sequences performed framed by its structure. The icosahedron comprises twenty faces, thirty edges and twelve vertices. My icosahedron is made of PVC pipe connected by 3D printed vertices/joints I designed. It fits my height and the movement sequence I perform inside is based on a vinyasa sequence which includes sirsasana (headstand). It is interesting how the geometry of the solids is linked to structural strength and balance.

REFERENCES
Bertol, Daniela. 2015. "The Making of Geometry". Procedia Technology. 20: 39-45. Bertol, Daniela. 2015. "Designing and Making a Movement Infrastructure". Procedia Technology. 20: 72-78. Bertol, Daniela. 2017. Form mind body space time - the geometry of human movement. Doctoral Dissertation.

Available from iTunes:
  • POLYHEDRA The Regular Solids:Their History and Evolution
  • POLYHEDRA 2 Star Polyhedra, Archimedean and Other Solids
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movement infrastructure presented at:
New York Maker Faire 2016: "Making Moves"
maker faire European Edition 2017, Rome